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DIY Bath Bomb Recipe with Wild Orange & Rose Oils

DIY bath bomb recipe - Dr. Axe

Bath bombs are amazing and can offer so many benefits in addition to being fun with all the fizz! But, is any bath bomb a good choice? Not really. Unfortunately, most that are on the market today contain loads of dangerous dyes and chemicals that can negatively affect your health.

I just posted an article asking the question: are bath bombs safe? Unless it’s a DIY bath bomb, it’s unlikely, as some of the dangers you’re exposed to include toxic fake fragrances, artificial food dyes and glitter that can enter your bloodstream, disrupt your hormones, cause urinary tract infections and yeast infections. Yay, you probably weren’t aware of all that when you last choose one!

However, the good news is that a DIY bath bomb recipe is very easy to make at home, and you can tailor them to your needs by using certain essential oils.


How to Make DIY Bath Bombs

Let’s get started on this DIY bath bomb recipe! In a glass or ceramic bowl, start with the baking soda, citric acid, sea salt and cornstarch. These are key components and where all the fizz comes from. Once these elements interact with water, especially the baking soda and citric acid, all sorts of excitement takes place. Baking soda has the benefits of detoxify and alkalizing the body, while offering softness to your skin. Sea salt provides magnesium that can be absorbed through the skin, and cornstarch also has the ability of helping soften the skin, giving it a silky feeling. Cornstarch also helps to harden the bath bomb. Blend all ingredients well.

In a separate bowl, let’s combine the liquid ingredients. Add the cream of tartar and the witch hazel to help harden the bath bomb. Cream of tartar is the sediment that comes from the bottom of a wine barrel, but it is not alcoholic. It contains high levels of potassium, but since you are not ingesting it, minimal amounts are absorbed through the skin and usually not a problem; however, if potassium is a concern, make sure to check with your doctor. Witch hazel is also a great toner for the skin containing tons of healing properties. It’s astringent properties are great for acne. (1)

Next, let’s mix in the oils. Almond oil is a great choice because it is light and wonderful for the skin. It can soothe chapped skin and has even been known to heal skin damaged by cancer. Benefit-rich coconut oil is, of course, a great addition. In particular, I love its skin softening capabilities while offering antifungal and antibacterial benefits. (2

Now, let’s add the wild orange essential oil and the rose essential oil. Wild orange is very uplifting to the body and mind offering an invigorating feeling. Rose essential oil is amazing for depression and decreasing anxiety. It also has benefits for the skin, helps balance hormones and could enhance your libido!

Now combine the liquid ingredients with the dry ingredients for your DIY bath bomb recipe.

Lastly, let’s add a hint of color. Using common, off-the-shelf food dyes can cause problems to your health. Instead, use a little beetroot powder to get a nice rosy-pink color and the added benefits of antioxidants!

Once you have blended all ingredients, you can shape your DIY bath bomb recipe into a ball. If you prefer, you can use a silicon bath bomb mold, lightly greased cookie mold or muffin tins to give it a specific shape. Since the mixture may expand, continue to push it into the mold you have chosen in the early stages of setting.

Allow it to set for 1–2 days so that it can form its shape as it dries. Once dry, store in an airtight container. Storing in the fridge can help keep it fresh since there aren’t any preservatives or chemicals in this bath bomb recipe, but using them within 2–3 weeks is best. And, of course, they make great gifts!

When you are ready to use your DIY bath bomb recipe, simply draw a nice warm bath and drop it in! Enjoy the effervescence and the delightful scents while gaining the relaxation that your body and mind may need.

 

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DIY Bath Bomb Recipe with Wild Orange & Rose Oils

Total Time: 10 minutes
Serves: Depends on mold size

Ingredients:

  • 1 cup baking soda
  • ½ cup citric acid
  • 1 tablespoon cornstarch
  • 1 teaspoon cream of tartar
  • ½ cup finely ground sea salt
  • 1½ teaspoons almond oil (optional apricot oil)
  • ½ teaspoon of coconut oil
  • 1 tablespoon witch hazel
  • 1 teaspoon beet root powder
  • wild orange essential oil
  • rose essential oil

Directions:

  1. Blend all dry ingredients in a bowl.
  2. Blend wet ingredients in a another bowl.
  3. Combine all ingredients.
  4. Place in mold of choice or just form a ball about 1–2 inches in diameter.
  5. Allow the bath bombs to dry for approximately 1–2 days.
  6. To use, place bath bomb in the bath.
  7. To store, place in airtight container. Storing in the refrigerator can allow the bath bombs to keep for about 3 weeks.

Josh Axe

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33 Comments

    • Lorrie Cummings on

      I love this recipe. I so glad I caught this episode I was watching recipes to make for my granddaughter she is 11 yrs old , and was wanting me to make some. I’m new at the whole bath bombs making , but I do use essential oils also her teacher keeps a disfusser in the class room. She is 11 yrs old her an her mom both buys and, uses them from a well known bath store. I have all the information you just gave out so that makes me happy about that, but know I’m concerned about what she already used. Right know she is sick I’m praying it’s not the flu besides I hate to see her sick and praying it’s not the flu I have MS know for over 15 yrs and Im not sure if I can be around her know. Thank you for all you information on the benefits of essential oil I have to take a lot of medication I hate and strong pain meds, depression and anxiety several. But I have to say I have made me a spray with oils that has kept me pretty much pain free with my legs is what hurt the most and frequently I glad to say after a week I’ve done well. I have two questions I used Skin So Soft and I’m sure you know who the company that makes it I do love it because it a light oil not heavy and great for my very dry and itchy skin from my MS. Is that oil ok to use. Also you said beetroot for color I’m sure the beets thats purchased in the can isn’t the same because of the ingredients to help with self life should I be concerned about using that? Also my son just called and the Dr. called in Tamaflu in for my granddaughter is there any oils that can help at this point with her already that’s meds. Thank you very much for sharing on youtube I have benefited from your knowledge of being healthy and I’m trying. Thank you Lorrie

      Reply
      • April on

        I know this is late and your granddaughter is surely feeling better by now but this may help later. When I don’t feel well, I like to use lavender, ginger, and chamomile oils. These help me relax enough to sleep and the ginger and chamomile both help settle the tummy. When I have a cold or feel achy, I use a blend of peppermint and eucalyptus oils. Be careful though, too much of these oils can make your skin feel too minty and cold.
        The beetroot for color is actually a powder. You can find it online. I’m not sure how well the canned beets would work. You could maybe substitute some of the juice for the water or witch hazel. The color is just for looks, so I usually omit it.
        Good luck with your bombs.

    • suzi on

      My thought as well. Is there any reason why you didn’t include epsom salt in this mix? I would think the added magnesium would be so great!!

      Reply
      • Renee on

        He did indicate that the sea salt was a good source of magnesium. It has a denser structure than the epsom salt – maybe that’s the reason?

    • Robin on

      I’m sure they meant epsom salt; It is magnesium sulphate.

      All regular “salt”…..table salt, sea salt…..is sodium chloride. No magnesium at all.

      Reply
  1. Cari on

    Storing in the fridge does not seem to be a good option. The fizz is activated by moisture. I would recommend that they be stored in a dry, dark area. Personally I wrap mine individually before placing in the airtight container. Sea salt attracts moisture so if you have a problem of you bombs falling apart or not drying you may want to use less.

    Reply
  2. gina on

    I love homemade bath bombs, so much better for me than bubble bath and I can control all of the ingredients. Just one note, cornstarch and cream of tarter are not really needed. I avoid cornstarch especially in combination with warm water as it can encourage yeast infections. I do sometimes use fragrances as well as essential oils, i just make sure they are phthalate free!

    Reply
    • Lucy on

      Hey! So you’re saying follow the recipe but omit the cornstarch and tartar?? Just wanting to make sure before trying to make these at home!

      Reply
  3. Peg Livergood on

    Hi Dr.Axe. I want to try your DIY Bath Bomb Recipe with Wild Orange & Rose Oils,how many drops of wild orange essential oil and rose essential oil do you use,it does not say.
    Thank you so much
    Peg

    Reply
    • Rylee on

      I am sorry but doctor axe does not answer the questions, other customers do. You can put however much as you would feel like it.

      Reply
    • Brittany McLane on

      I recommend 20-30 drops in total. You don’t want to add too much moisture as it may cause unintended fizzing.

      Reply
  4. Kristen on

    I have made 2 batches of this recipe. For me personally, it’s not working. Even with no water spritz, they still seem to activate at some point during the process because the molds open into a bubbly mess with the texture of a pumice stone. But…I am in the mountains and maybe the elevation is affecting the process. 🤔 The smell is really amazing though.

    Reply
    • zann on

      If your mixture is fizzing then you need less liquid ingredients. I had a hard time finding the right balance but got it on the 3rd try! You can always add more liquid so start with very little. It also helps to use a hand mixer while you are adding the liquids. Good luck:)

      Reply
    • Vee Watson on

      I use nothing more than citric acid, baking soda, almond oil, essential oil of choice, and a TINY spritz of water to make my bath bombs. So far, I have had no problems and I’ve made loads of them.

      Reply
  5. Noelani Ortisi on

    Why don’t you talk about magnesium, Epsom salts in a bath bomb. Magnesium is a calming
    Muscle relaxer and is a very nice compliment to a bath bomb.

    Reply
    • Melissa on

      SLS is always bad for you. :( I haven’t made bath bombs yet. Plan on doing so soon though. The fizzing comes from the reaction of the bath bomb and the water in the bath tub.

      Reply
  6. Stacy on

    What is citric acid, what’s the befits to our body? I have made this recipe before but hearing ‘citric acid’ just worries me. Ease my mind my please and explain this. Thanks!

    Reply
  7. Susan T Blake on

    Essential Oil specialists recommend using a total of 5 drops of essential oil in a bath. That doesn’t sound like much but, because they are so concentrated, it will be plenty. More than that can be an irritant. Also, note that citrus oils like Wild Orange can make your skin sensitive to the sun.

    Reply
  8. Rene on

    This particular recipe calls for almond oil/apricot oil/coconut oil… any other possible suggestions?

    In our household we have allergies to coconut, tree nuts, peanuts, cashews, pitted fruits, pineapple, tomato, mango, papaya, and wheat.

    Thanks.

    Reply
  9. Flora Schaub on

    Some folks have mentioned the use of salt, and Epsom Salts, in the bath bomb recipe. My experience is that both draw-in moisture from the environment. I live in a humid environment and because of the drawn-in moisture, I believe, the bath bombs I made using both as ingredients appeared to have increased in size, to have also grown “warts,” and they lost their fizz when used in the tub. I’m certain it wasn’t due to the liquid ingredients I used, for my bath bombs made without salt or Epsom Salts never do that. Maybe for makers who live in an arid environment salt and/or Epsom Salts would be a good ingredient.

    Reply

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