Pickled Green Beans (Dilly Beans)

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Pickled green beans recipe

I’m always interested in new ways to spice up my usual side dishes. So, when I found myself with an abundance of green beans, I decided it was time to add some new life to an old favorite. You’re probably used to steamed green beans with a bit of butter or maybe sautéed in a stir fry, but have you tried pickled green beans?

When you think of pickling, your mind probably goes straight to pickles, but did you know you can actually pickle a number of different vegetables? Pickling foods is a way of preserving them and, with some foods (like these green beans!), fermenting them for improved gut health.

While you’ll need to let a few weeks pass before you can eat these pickled green beans — or dilly beans, depending on where you’re from — they’re well worth it.

Benefits of Green Beans

Green beans are a legume that’s loaded with health benefits. Did you know that there are more than 130 kinds? You might see them called snap beans or string beans, but rest assured, they all share the same health benefits.

Because green beans are full of starch and fiber,  they’re not processed by the digestive system immediately, letting the body absorb the nutrients and positively affecting your health long after you’ve finished eating. It’s one of the reasons why green beans are great if you’re managing or trying to prevent diabetes. As a low glycemic index food, the carbohydrates found in green beans are released slowly, allowing time for your body to adjust, rather than spiking and dipping your blood sugar.

If you’re looking for antioxidants, you can find them in green beans. Antioxidants help to fight the free radicals that damage the body and contribute to disease.

Pickled green beans ingredients - Dr. Axe

How to Make Pickled Green Beans

First, make sure you have around five pint jars with lids (and maybe rings) ready to go. They need to be cleaned and sterilized. Running them through the dishwasher is the best way. No dishwasher? Then clean with warm, soapy water.

It’s time to prepare these pickled green beans! Prepare the beans by cutting the ends off and making sure they can fit in the jar. For beans that are too long, cut in half.

In a medium bowl, combine the apple cider vinegar, maple sugar, water and salt, whisking until salt is dissolved. Transfer the liquid to a pot and bring to a boil.

Pickled green beans step 1 - Dr. Axe

Next, loosely pack each jar with some of the dill (even distributed between the five jars) and the beans.

Once the pickling liquid boils, ladle it into each jar, filling nearly to the top. Let the pickling mix cool to room temperature, which may take up to 10 hours.

Pickled green beans step 3 - Dr. Axe

Once the pickling liquid is cool, seal the jars with lids (and potentially rings). Place in a cool, dark place and allow the green beans to ferment for two to three weeks.

Pickled green beans recipe - Dr. Axe

If you have any jars that aren’t sealing properly, stick them in the refrigerator and consume within a week.

Canning dilly beans has never been easier! I love eating these green beans as a snack, adding them to salads or serving them as a room temperature side.

Once you get used to making these pickled green beans, you can start to try different variations of the recipe. Some recipes call for dill seeds; others turn this into a spicy dish by adding red pepper flakes or cayenne pepper.

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Pickled green beans

Pickled Green Beans Recipe


  • Author: Dr. Josh Axe
  • Total Time: 2–3 weeks
  • Yield: 10 1x
  • Diet: Vegan

Description

When you think of pickling, cucumbers becoming pickles comes to mind. But did you know you can actually pickle a number of different vegetables? Green beans are a top choice. It’s easy to do and makes for a great snack or side dish.


Ingredients

Scale
  • 5 pint glass jars and lids (like Ball jars), thoroughly cleaned and sterilized
  • 2 pounds fresh green beans, ends chopped off
  • 1 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 2 cups warm water
  • 1 tablespoon maple sugar
  • 1 tablespoon sea salt
  • 3 tablespoons fresh dill, optional

Instructions

  1. First, clean and sterilize the jars. Running them through the dishwasher is the best way. No dishwasher? Then clean with warm, soapy water.
  2. Prepare the beans by cutting the ends off and making sure they can fit in the jar. For beans that are too long, cut in half.
  3. In a medium bowl, combine vinegar, water, maple sugar and salt, whisking until salt is dissolved.
  4. Transfer to a pot and bring to a boil.
  5. While the liquid mixture is on the stovetop, loosely pack each jar with some of the dill (even distributed between the 5 jars) and the beans.
  6. When liquid boils, ladle the pickling liquid into each jar, filling nearly to the top. Allow it to cool to room temperature, around 10 hours.
  7. When cooled, seal the jars with lids (and potentially rings). Allow green beans to ferment for 2 to 3 weeks in a cool, dark space before serving.
  8. Refrigerate any jars that do not seal properly and consume within a week.

Notes

Once you get used to making these pickled green beans, you can start to try different variations of the recipe. Some recipes call for dill seeds; others turn this into a spicy dish by adding red pepper flakes or cayenne pepper.

  • Prep Time: 10 min
  • Category: Snacks, Side Dishes
  • Method: Pickling
  • Cuisine: American

Nutrition

  • Serving Size: 165g
  • Calories: 36
  • Sugar: 3.8g
  • Sodium: 170mg
  • Fat: 0.2g
  • Saturated Fat: 0g
  • Unsaturated Fat: 0.1g
  • Trans Fat: 0g
  • Carbohydrates: 7.4g
  • Fiber: 2.4g
  • Protein: 1.6g
  • Cholesterol: 0mg

Keywords: pickled green beans, dilly beans

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8 Comments

  1. Ann King on

    You say “When cooled, seal the jars with lids (and potentially rings). Allow green beans to ferment for 2 to 3 weeks in a cool, dark space before serving.”. Can you lids put on & water bath can instead of fermenting?

    Reply
    • Ann King on

      Check the recommendation on newer lids. I believe it says to not boil them any longer but put in hot (near boiling) water. Many newer lids aren’t great!

      Reply
  2. Debbie on

    There is an asterisk next to the full on the ingredient list but not sure what it is referring to. Also I would think the kids would have to go on while the mixture is hot to be able to seal the jar, right?

    Reply
  3. Bobbie on

    Do you use mason jars with lids and rings? If so, watch for the depression when sealed like when canning. They should make a pinging sound. Am I correct?

    Reply
    • Ann King on

      Doesn’t look like he’s doing water bath canning but rather cooling & fermenting the beans. I’ve never done fermenting so I’m questioning this in above comments.

      Reply

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