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How to Make Bone Broth at Home + Bone Broth Recipes

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Beef Bone Broth

If you’ve heard about the incredible healing powers of bone broth, it’s no surprise that you probably want to learn how to make bone broth at home. Not only is it absolutely delicious, but it’s also highly beneficial to health. In fact, it’s become a staple in many diets, especially those of the keto and Paleo variety. What are the benefits of bone broth? Some top bone broth benefits include improvements in joint and digestive health (such as leaky gut), a reduction in inflammation, and a better night’s sleep, just to name a few.

While you can easily buy bone broth or stock at grocery stores these days, making homemade bone broth trumps store-bought any day. Bone broth is not the same as stock, just so you know. What is the difference between bone broth and stock? True bone broth requires a much longer cooking time than stock. This additional time allows for much more of the bone’s nutrients to permeate the delicious broth.


How to Make Bone Broth and Bone Broth Recipe Basics

There are a few important basics to consider when making a good bone broth. Nutrition researcher Sally Fallon of the Weston A. Price Foundation says that for a quality bone broth recipe, it’s important to use body parts that aren’t commonly found in the meat department of your grocery store. That includes things like chicken feet and neck. What kind of bones are best for bone broth? Make sure to buy animal bones and parts that you know are organic, grass-fed, and free of antibiotics and hormones in order to truly optimize bone broth benefits.

You can make bone broth with animal components alone, but studies show that the combination of animal products and vegetables seems to have synergistic effects, working together to be more beneficial than either alone. For the classic bone broth recipe, Fallon describes the essentials as bones, fat, meat, vegetables and water.

Like to make a weekly roast chicken? Don’t throw away that carcass — it’s the perfect start to a batch of bone broth. Add in whole vegetables, such as carrots, celery, onions and garlic, and/or use the scraps of these vegetables, including onion skin, carrot tops, etc. These odds and ends that you wouldn’t normally put in other recipes make very nutrient-rich and flavor-enhancing additions to your broth. And since you’ll ultimately strain the stock before storing/serving it, there’s no worries about ending up with onion skin in your final product.

Next, add in water, sea salt, peppercorns and a little apple cider vinegar. Another popular addition is bay leaf. You can also add in any other additional herbs and spices that you enjoy.

If you’re making beef broth or lamb broth, you should brown any of the leftover meat or organ meat before putting it into a stockpot. Beef bones don’t need to be cooked beforehand. Fish and poultry (chicken or turkey) are fine to put in a pot without browning first. Don’t forget to add a bit of apple cider vinegar to your pot to hel